Blog

With Remote Operations, Security is (Even More) Important

With Remote Operations, Security is (Even More) Important

Since the beginning of the COVID 19 pandemic, it has been clear that many companies were not prepared to continue their operations remotely. This was largely due to their leadership being convinced in recent years that allowing people to work remotely would lead to a considerable reduction in production, leading them to be unprepared to shift to remote functionality. Cybercriminals have taken advantage of many organizations as a result, so today we’ll discuss what needs to be done to secure endpoints from afar.

Many of the tools and strategies needed to keep your company's data infrastructure secure may be new to you and your business, but in most cases, they are measures that any organization that wants to protect its IT should take. Let's take a look at some of the strategies used to secure remote endpoints.

Virtual Private Networking

A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a tool you may have heard of, that establishes an encrypted connection between your business’ network and a remote endpoint. This allows people to send and receive information securely by passing it on via an intermediary network. The configuration of the VPN is where people start to get confused.

IT administrators must therefore decide which security priorities to set for their network and which to disable. With more data coming in—and encrypted, for that matter—more bandwidth will be required, and the amount required for the entire team is going to be costly. On the other hand, there are clear security concerns without the VPN in place, making this a delicate balance.

Phish Fighting

Phishing is one of the largest cybersecurity issues for either in-house or remote employees, but arguably is a bigger risk for an employee working from home. After all, they likely aren’t under the same protections that should be set up in the office. Today’s Endpoint Protection and Response (EDR) tools can help to mitigate some of this risk, but the onus will still be on the user with their fingers on the keyboard.

Therefore, training your employees to recognize an attempted phishing attack is the most effective way to really deter them. Establishing and repeatedly reinforcing the best practices and warning signs, and what to do if they do encounter one, is the best strategy to protect your business from phishing.

Threat Intelligence

Of course, you shouldn’t rely exclusively on your end users to protect your business. Your IT department should also have installed a comprehensive threat intelligence system, which helps to keep you protected from new threats as they develop. At the very least, your IT resource will be kept up to speed on the threats posing risks to your technology.

Incident Response

Finally, you have to account for the fact that one of your users will likely slip up and get “hooked,” so to speak, by a phishing attack. Accidents happen, nobody’s perfect. In these cases, the EDR can help you determine how badly you’ve been breached, quarantining the impacted areas and resolving the threat. There are even options to help automate your anti-hacker efforts.

Putting it plainly, any business that uses technology—really, any business currently in operation—needs to worry about its cybersecurity. To learn more about the protections and precautions you should take, give our IT experts a call at 603-889-0800.

Related Posts

Security is a major part of any business, and if there isn’t a diligent approach to the implementation of it, you can be left with huge holes in your network. This month, we thought we would discuss some of the best practices you can take to make sur...
Keeping your network and infrastructure free from threats is always a priority, but with so many people working remotely, businesses have encountered problems doing so. In fact, hackers and scammers have come out of the woodwork to try and gain entry...
What would you consider to be the biggest threat to your business and its continued operations? Cybercrime? A natural disaster? What if I told you that it was the team members that you have employed—whether they meant to be or not? This is the hard t...
The smartwatch is one of the most popular gifts given to technology lovers; and, they have quite a bit of utility. They can help improve communication, health, and of course give them a sleek accessory. One problem that people don’t often consider is...

True to form, 2020 has given us a final parting gift: the news that the United States was targeted this year by the biggest cyberespionage attack ever. Let’s go into the ramifications of this attack, and what it should teach us going forward.

Over a quarter of all data breaches happen to small businesses. The cost of a data breach is really prohibitive to your business’ operational and financial health. To keep your business’ data and infrastructure free of threats and relatively secure, ...
Over the past year, entrepreneurs have focused on how to do business during the global COVID-19 pandemic. The public health crisis has been an opportunity for fraudsters and hackers, and the result has been an increase in losses (compared to the seco...
If fortune smiles on your company, you won’t ever have to deal with what we are about to discuss: ransomware. For the past several years ransomware has been a major issue for businesses, governments, and individuals. Today, we will talk about ransomw...
Having success in business often relies on developing trustworthy relationships. You have to trust your vendors and suppliers to get you the resources you need, you need to trust your staff to complete their tasks without putting your business in har...
When it comes to ransomware, we have always stood firm in our recommendation not to pay whoever is responsible for locking down your systems. However, due to the globalized nature of technology and cybercrime, it is even more important that companies...
As a communication tool, the video conferencing app Zoom saw a considerable bump in its popularity with both personal and business users as the coronavirus pandemic made other means of meeting no longer viable. However, this sudden increase in its us...
Business relationships, especially between you and a service provider or you and a coworker, are crucial to a business’ success. However, maintaining these relationships can be challenging when there’s a good chance that your actions might create mor...

Onsite Service Coverage Area

Although we provide remote services and support to businesses in over 20 states, onsite services are limited to within reasonable driving distance from our office in NH.  For locations outside of our service area, we will manage a local vendor to provide onsite assistance when needed.

 

Onsite Computer Support Services are available to businesses within 100 miles of Nashua New Hampshire. We have excellent onsite coverage from Concord NH, south through Manchester NH, and then down into Boston. From Northern and Central Mass, we cover from Worcester, east to the North Shore, including the Salem and Portsmouth NH area.

 

White Mountain IT Services
33 Main Street, Suite 302
Nashua, New Hampshire 03064

 

603-889-0800

map nashua4 1

 

Open Positions