Blog

Scammers and Skimmers Are a Bad Combination

Scammers and Skimmers Are a Bad Combination

Considering how often hackers target financial credentials like credit card numbers and expiration dates, it’s not surprising that ATMs can provide a wealth of information to them. Hackers are willing to go exceedingly far just to get their hands on these credentials--including physically altering the devices themselves to install skimmers and other technology on them. Unless you know what to look for, it can be difficult to tell if a machine has been tampered with.


For example, this news article from this past July shows a rather troublesome case of ATM skimming. The device used is a piece of plastic that slips right over the ATM card reader, and it’s designed to do so without being seen by the user. If you’re not paying attention, you could accidentally expose your credentials directly to the hacker.

There are a considerable amount of cases that involve a hacker installing custom hardware onto ATMs that can wirelessly transmit credentials, who might be lurking somewhere nearby. They can then harvest credentials at their leisure.

What would you do if you took a look at your bank account and found that you no longer have a balance in your checking account? What if you wound up going into debt because of this? What if someone has stolen your identity and is making purchases in foreign countries? The best way to keep this from happening is to be careful of ATM skimmers in the first place. Keep the following tips in mind when using an ATM.

  • Cameras surrounding the ATM: Before you stick your card in the ATM, make sure that there are several cameras pointing directly at the machine. This usually means that a hacker likely won’t try to mess with the device. ATMs usually have built-in cameras anyway, but it can never hurt to take another look around.
  • Tampering with the device: Give the device a once-over before you try to use it. Are any faceplates removed, or devices sticking out of it? If there is anything that doesn’t look natural, chances are that it’s been tampered with by a hacker.
  • Additional testing: Before you place your card in the device, take a look at the insert slot. Has it been placed on artificially? Just look for anything that’s out of place. Remember, it’s better to be safe than sorry.

What do you think about ATM skimmers? Do you think you can identify threats to your financial credentials? To learn more, reach out to us at 603-889-0800.

Related Articles

  • Is It Safe to Have Your Browser Remember Your Passwords? Let’s be honest - not all of us have the best memories. This makes the ability for many browsers to remember our passwords seem like a godsend. However, is this capability actually a good thing for your cybersecurity? The answer may not surprise you. Nope! While yes, the fact that we no longer ha...
  • What Could Possibly Be Wrong with Your Computer? Slow computers are one of the small annoyances in an office that can implicate a much larger issue is hidden. The frustration stems from not being able to get anything done, whether it’s because the computer isn’t responding to your commands or it’s so slow that you can’t accomplish anything notewor...
  • Tip of the Week: Awareness Is Important When Surfing the Web We all love the Internet. We all use it almost every day. For this week’s tip, we’ll review a few ways to help keep yourself from getting in trouble while browsing. Sacrificing Security for ConvenienceFor starters, most of the threats to be found online are of the sort that can be avoided somewha...
  • Tip of the Week: Keyboard Shortcuts to Save You Time Even the simplest tasks in the office can eat up a surprising amount of time over the span of a year. For example, did you know that switching from your keyboard to your mouse can consume up to eight full work days every year? By taking advantage of keyboard shortcuts, you can cut down on the amount...
  • Could You Spot a Social Engineering Attack? As invaluable as the security solutions that protect a network are, they can be effectively rendered useless if a cybercriminal is skilled in social engineering. Social engineering is the practice of using manipulation to access protected resources, as we will review later. If your business and its ...
  • Three Gifts for Your IT Resource The holiday season is here, and the spirit of giving is in the air. Why not give the IT professional in your life a few things that they’ve been wishing for all year? Here, we’ve compiled a list of things you can give them, some of which will cost you (and your business) nothing. Wish One: Securi...
With the surge in the number of small and medium businesses that have fallen prey to malware and cyber criminals, there is a lot of focus of what an organization can do to prevent being a victim and how the company should handle themselves after an attack. There is another key factor to preventing cyber criminals from penetrating into your network:...

- Onsite Service Coverage Area -

Onsite Computer Support Services are available to businesses within 100 miles of Nashua New Hampshire. We have excellent onsite coverage from Concord NH, south through Manchester NH and then down into Boston. From Northern and Central Mass we cover from Worcester, east to the North Shore, including the Salem and Portsmouth NH area.

 

603-889-0800

White Mountain IT Services
33 Main Street Suite 302
Nashua, New Hampshire 03064

 

 padlock1  Cyber Security Toolkit

cloud desktop2 Cloud Desktop Login

Open Positions